Tag Archives: android

Android Example of a Zoomable Game Board

In this article, I describe how I built a simple game board in Android. The sample app shows a grid of squares that represents a game board. The squares on the game board come from an array of image tiles. The grid can be zoomed in or out and moved. Touch events are triggered when squares are touched. Regular and long press are handled. With this sample as a starting point, it should be easy to build a game that uses a board of squares. Continue reading

Advertisements
Posted in Android, Game Design | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Demo of a Zoomable Game Board

For my next Android tutorial, I am working on a demo app for a game board. The app displays a grid of squares that represents a game board. The grid can be zoomed in or out and moved. Touch events are triggered when squares are touched. Regular and long press are handled….

Here is a short video of the demo app in action. … Continue reading

Posted in Android, Game Design | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Saving Game Progress in the Cloud in Double Star

Double Star is a turn-based space war game for Android. The most recent version of the app now supports saving game progress in the cloud. This gives players: (a) game play across multiple devices; and (b) restoring progress after reinstallation. Continue reading

Posted in Android | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Tutorial: How to Implement In-app Billing in Android – Part 2

Part 1 of this article was my guide on how to get started with in-app purchases in Android. It was published in July 2014. Finally, here is part 2. …

Part 1 covered the operational side of things: defining in-app products, application keys, etc. In this article, I will offer some suggestions on how to adapt the TrivialDrive code for your own app. The code provided with TrivialDrive is very well structured and we all can learn a lot from it. Most of the hard work is done in classes inside the util package of TrivialDrive. Without that package, the MainActivity would be much more difficult. The changes I suggest below are refinements on what is in the MainActivity provided by the Google team.
..
For my own work, I made the transition from the in-app purchases of the TrivialDrive sample app (Figure 1, left) to the purchases of my space war app (Figure 2, right). Continue reading

Posted in Android | Tagged , , , , | 14 Comments

Beta Test for the Double Star Game

Beta test continues for the Double Star app for Android. …
Double Star is a turn-based, single player, space war game. In the game, you command a powerful starship. You must first save our planet from the invasion. Then you search the galaxy for the home world of the invaders so you can destroy them once and for all.

… To install the Double Star game, do one of the following:

(1) If you have a Google id, join the Double Star Google group.
(2) If you are in Google+, join the Double Star community.
Continue reading

Posted in Android | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

A game to try: Alien Star Menace

Don’t know if you have time to try another game, but here’s one from one of the people in an Indie Games Meetup group I am in. It’s called “Alien Star Menace” and it is available on both Android and iOS. It was just released in the last two weeks. It’s done in Unity. … I like it because it is a turn-based strategy game, and it is set in space. I also like the “Hero Academy” style of play. I am not very far along, just a few levels in. It’s amusing and challenging at the same time. Continue reading

Posted in Android | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

The Thirty Second Hook and Double Star

I recently read “The 30-Second Hook” on Gamasutra. It’s a very good article about the experience of the developers of Blowfish Meets Meteor. The author talks about the experience dealing with the problem of making your game appealing to players trying your game. You have to hook players quickly or, in may cases, you lose them. He writes, “people played only the rather simplistic, tutorial-based first level and put it down because they assumed this was a reflection of the entire game.”

It seems that this might apply to my Double Star Android game. Twenty levels of play are provided in the game, with mysteries, challenges, and rewards along the way. However, it all starts with a training level. If training takes too long, players might never get to the more interesting parts of the game.

The latest beta release of the game introduces a short training level.
Continue reading

Posted in Android, Game Design | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment